Category Archives: Inclusion

Children becoming safe and active agents

Engaging children in a conversation on active supervision Active supervision of children is an integral part of quality early childhood education and care. Educators fulfil their essential ethical and professional responsibilities to ensure that children are safe, secure and positively included in experiences that maximise their learning and development. Educators are made aware of this […]

Promoting cultural competence in early childhood

There is growing awareness and effort in Australian classrooms to understand, respect and support cultural differences, but are we starting early enough? If we want to create a society that values diversity, we must start instilling an appreciation for multiculturalism in young children as early as possible. Learning and development happens rapidly during early childhood, […]

Encouraging and courageous; the winners of the Anti-Bias Award

Early Childhood Australia recently had a first row seat to the online 2020 Anti-Bias Awards. The award, now in its fourth year, was created in partnership with MultiVerse, Social Justice In Early Childhood, and Early Childhood Australia.  Congratulations to the winners of the 2020 Anti-Bias Award: Allyson Cuskelly, Kirby Barker and Cath Gillespie from Evans […]

What if?

Since the introduction of the EYLF intentional teaching has become one of our professional buzzwords. While the idea that we might have an active role to play in children’s learning is not a new one, the term has helped us to see that our intentions matter – both to us and to the children we […]

Being Equitable Does Not Mean We All Get the Same Thing

I spent December and January travelling through Europe. Being tuned to all things early childhood I made the following observations: Peppa Pig is annoying in any language. Noise cancelling headphones on a plane don’t cancel out everything Nutella crepes do taste better and are better for you, if made in France The last flight out […]

Sending children back to Nauru risks creating a generation of damaged people

The 37 asylum seeker babies and 54 children who risk deportation from Australia could face significant, irreversible mental health damage if sent back to Nauru. And the longer they’re detained, the greater the risk of damage. A report released today by the Australian Human Rights Commission shows children previously detained on Nauru already show significant […]

To Top