Tag Archives: Early childhood Education and Care

Music and inclusion

music and inclusion image

You’ve probably heard it said many times that music is good for children; and unlike vitamins or broccoli, it also ‘tastes’ good! Researchers in recent years have been building up a convincing case, showing that music eases stress, stimulates brain development, aids memory and spatial awareness, supports communication and language development and promotes a sense […]

Three reasons why we need a new Convention on the Rights of the Child

The Australian Government’s Child Care Package has raised old tensions between the twin objectives of early childhood education and care – parent’s workforce participation and child development. For the first time, children may not be able to access child care subsidies if one of their parents is not undertaking work or another eligible activity. Modelling by the […]

Kids prefer maths when you let them figure out the answer for themselves

Peter Sullivan, Monash University A common view is that students learn maths best when teachers give clear explanations of mathematical concepts, usually in isolation from other concepts, and students are then given opportunities to practise what they have been shown. I’ve recently undertaken research at primary and junior secondary levels exploring a different approach. This […]

Australia lagging behind rest of the developed world on early-childhood education

All over the developed world, a revolution has occurred in the way childcare services are viewed: from mere child minding to vital early-childhood education. Globally, early-childhood education and care are seen as critical not just in promoting workforce participation but in creating foundations for learning, boosting the capacity of the rising generation to contribute to […]

Can inclusive education do more harm than good?

Recently, a teacher expressed his misgivings about the “inclusion at all costs” ideology of modern education. Despite being well supported by his school and hugely in favour of inclusive practice, he outlined his difficulties in managing a young fellow with Down Syndrome whose behaviour in the classroom was extremely difficult, and increasingly dangerous. This resulted […]

To Top