Category Archives: Opinion pieces

Treasure learning for life

Lifelong learning and dispositions for learning are an important part of young children’s education and care. It’s a message for adults too. Twenty years after Australia’s first Adult Learners’ Week it’s that time again: to learn for the heck of it not for the qualification. The first day of September begins Adult Learners’ Week 2015, (1 to 8 September). Whatever your […]

Should we swear in front of our kids?

The other day, my toddler son came home from childcare saying “piss poo”. He is one of the younger children in his classroom and clearly he heard this phrase from an older child he admired. I couldn’t help laughing at this unexpected outburst, which reinforced this behaviour – thus cementing the phrase in his emerging […]

Children – where are their tribes?

No body likes Everybody hates me I think I’ll go and eat some worms Fat ones skinny ones Long ones short ones Ones that squiggle and squirm I’ll bite their heads off Suck their guts out And throw their skins away Nobody knows how much I enjoy Eating worms three times a day – (Unknown) When […]

The journey towards critical reflection

Educators reflect on their actions every day. Reflection is the thinking educators do as they are working with a child, while also observing the environment and planning what they will do next. Donald Schon, internationally recognised author of The Reflective Practitioner , believes we engage in two types of reflection – reflection in action and […]

Needs and rights

The concept of needs is no longer part of the early childhood discourse. The EYLF (Department of Education Employment and Workplace Relations, 2009) focuses on a strengths-based perspective, positioning children as active participants who are entitled to respect and agency. In the latest Every Child Julie Rutups (2015) argued that in building on children’s strengths […]

Babies and bathwater

Some educational authorities have taken the word ‘needs’ out of planning and assessment guidelines, at least in headings, focusing only on strengths and abilities. Clearly it is important for educators to plan and work with children’s strengths and abilities. The question for me is whether it helps children to do this at the expense of […]

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