All posts by Ryan Spencer

As a Clinical Teaching Specialist in Literacy Education at the University of Canberra, Ryan brings a unique perspective and insight into the challenges facing teacher education. Ryan currently convenes and lectures in two first year literacy subjects for pre-service teachers, focusing upon effective reading instruction. Prior to his appointment at the University of Canberra, Ryan was Program Co-ordinator and Literacy Advisor for the U-CAN Read Literacy Intervention Program. The U-CAN Read program is a joint project of the University of Canberra and the ACT Education and Training Directorate and is designed to provide parents and carers with the skills, strategies and support to assist their children to read. Ryan has eleven years teaching experience across all primary grade levels in both the New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory public education systems. He completed his Master of Educational Leadership in 2012. His research interests focus upon parent education, engaging boys in literacy to improve their educational outcomes and the impact of new technology upon reading instruction. Ryan has presented at a number of education conferences in the area of reading instruction, most recently in Osaka, Japan. Ryan is a member of Australian Literacy Educator's Association (ALEA) and is a member of the Executive Committee in the ACT, currently holding the position of Treasurer. Ryan is also a member of the International Reading Association and the Primary English Teacher's Association.

Kids need to like what they’re reading to progress

When we think of reading for our children, we are often misled into thinking that we need to focus on one type of book, such as picture books or novels in order to practise specific, reading-related skills. However, this narrowly-focused approach to reading instruction can often have undesirable benefits, such as turning kids off reading […]

Knowing your child’s reading stage and how to help them

University of Canberra Learning to read is a complicated process and parents often wonder if their child is developing reading abilities at the rate they “should”. Research agrees, however, that reading (and writing) is very much a developmental process, which can look very different for different children, regardless of their age. It can be very […]

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